Wednesday, 26 May 2010

Winter Aconites In May?

Way back in March when the Winter Aconites were in full flower I mentioned that if you wait until the seed pods form, you can harvest the seed and spread it around on any spare bit of ground to increase your stock. Well this is what the ripe seed pods look like. I collected quite a large handful of seed today, and  was tempted to sow it in a seed tray, thinking it would be a useful way of increasing the stock of plants, but when I  looked it up, I found that it will take a year to germinate, another year before it's ready to transplant, and probably two further years before it flowers! No wonder it's taken a few years before I've noticed any increase in the number of flowers. I think I'll just sprinkle it around and cover with a bit of compost, and hope for the best.


I will however dig up a few of the plants before they die down completely, and split them up as with snowdrops, this will increase my stock and will be a bit quicker!

6 comments:

  1. Those are very different. Pretty...Amazingly slow to make new ones huh :O)

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  2. How lovely and delicate! That sure is a long time to wait!

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  3. Even the seed pod is beautiful. I never heard of these, but, they sound like they might grow well in my shady gardens.

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  4. I think I commented to you about your winter aconite in March...But I really would love to plant some, but can't find the seed or anything for it...But I'm not going to give up! Their bright color is so welcome at the first hint of spring!!

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  5. When I first saw the photo I thought it was of flowers. The seed pods are very pretty. I am always interested in flowers that grow in the shade.

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  6. awesome blog, do you have twitter or facebook? i will bookmark this page thanks. jasmin holzbauer

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